Lord of the Rings Actor Narrates BibleMesh Online Course

HAMILTON, Bermuda—Actor John Rhys-Davies (Gimli in The Lord of the Rings trilogy) has partnered with the website BibleMesh.com as narrator of The Biblical Story, an online Bible survey course that explains how all of Scripture points to Christ.

The Bible is “a book that, even if you haven’t read it, has had an influence on your life,” Rhys-Davies said in the docudrama KJB [King James Bible]: The Book that Changed the World.

Joining Rhys-Davies in The Biblical Story’s 90-minute overview video is New York pastor and author Tim Keller who teaches the biblical theology throughout the video. Eric Metaxas, author of the bestseller Bonhoeffer, co-authored the video script along with King’s College President Greg Thornbury.

“BibleMesh is blessed with a gifted and diverse team of contributors,” publisher Emmanuel Kampouris said. “We’re grateful to have John Rhys-Davies partner with us. He’s an accomplished actor, and his narration helps present the Bible in a vivid and engaging way.”

The Biblical Story is entirely online and does not require any downloading or printing of material. It is being used as a textbook replacement in colleges and seminaries around the world. In addition to the overview video, the course provides commentary by a host of noted evangelicals: Hundreds of one-page articles introduce key Bible ideas while short teaching videos expound crucial points.

Among the personalities featured are Alistair Begg, senior pastor of Parkside Church in metropolitan Cleveland; Philip Ryken, president of Wheaton College in Illinois; J. Ligon Duncan, newly elected chancellor of Reformed Theological Seminary in Jackson, Mississippi; and Christopher Ash, director of London’s Cornhill Training Course.

“BibleMesh is not just facts,” said Thornbury, one of the course’s theological editors. “It’s a whole-Bible theology approach to learning Scripture.”

For more information, visit www.BibleMesh.com/story

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Home for Bible Translators Partners with BibleMesh Biblical Language

Home for Bible Translators (HBT) can be found nestled in the Judean hills just outside of Jerusalem in Yad haSh’mona. Mother tongue Bible translators from 35 different countries have made the journey from their own countries to HBT to learn the language of the Bible in the land of the Bible so that they are better equipped to undertake the important work of Bible translation when they return home.

HBTbaseHBT base in Yad haSh’mona

Hebrew language study for HBT Bible translators is based at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In the most recent course, however, HBT has partnered with BibleMesh Biblical Languages so their students, coming from many different countries, can supplement their Hebrew language study with BibleMesh’s text based, inductive language program, as well as continue to use the program once they return to their home countries.

In the video below Hal Ronning, the director of HBT, talks with Timothy Edwards about the work and ministry of HBT as well as how BibleMesh has helped in training their students in the important work of Bible translation.

Greg Thornbury on the Crucifixion

Greg Thornbury is the Dean of the School of Theology and Missions and Vice President for Spiritual Life at Union University in Jackson, TN. He also serves as editor for the “Q&A on the Bible” section of the BibleMesh Blog.

BibleMesh aims to help people understand the big picture as well as important facts of the Bible. The first BibleMesh resource is “The Biblical Story,” a course that presents Scripture as a cohesive narrative of God’s work in the world from Genesis to Revelation. It utilizes an interactive quizzing tool that helps people remember what they have learned. And finally, it includes a social networking platform which will allow pastors and church leaders to host their own online Bible studies and contribute their own resources. Forthcoming content will include courses in Biblical Greek and Hebrew.

VIDEO: Alistair Begg on the Death of Christ

 

Alistair Begg is the senior minister at Parkview Church in Cleveland, Ohio.

BibleMesh aims to help people understand the big picture as well as important facts of the Bible. The first BibleMesh resource is “The Biblical Story,” a course that presents Scripture as a cohesive narrative of God’s work in the world from Genesis to Revelation. It utilizes an interactive quizzing tool that helps people remember what they have learned. And finally, it includes a social networking platform which will allow pastors and church leaders to host their own online Bible studies and contribute their own resources. Forthcoming content will include courses in Biblical Greek and Hebrew.

The Security of Stained Glass—Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968)

From a Birmingham jail in 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. penned his now famous response to the liberal clergymen who opposed his methods for fighting racial discrimination.1 Among his many disappointments, one stood out above all others. In the face of manifest ungodliness, the Church had been silent. King was painfully aware that when the Church is silent about sin, evil will follow. As a minister of the gospel, he was equally convinced that the Church could speak prophetically to the culture and transform it. But unless her voice was faithful and clear, she would become irrelevant. He was right.

Let me take note of my other major disappointment. I have been so greatly disappointed with the white church and its leadership . . . I do not say this as one of those negative critics who can always find something wrong with the church. I say this as a minister of the gospel, who loves the church; who was nurtured in its bosom; who has been sustained by its spiritual blessings and who will remain true to it as long as the cord of life shall lengthen.

When I was suddenly catapulted into the leadership of the bus protest in Montgomery, Alabama, a few years ago, I felt we would be supported by the white church, felt that the white ministers, priests and rabbis of the South would be among our strongest allies. Instead, some have been outright opponents, refusing to understand the freedom movement and misrepresenting its leaders; and too many others have been more cautious than courageous and have remained silent behind the anesthetizing security of stained-glass windows . . .

In the midst of blatant injustices inflicted upon the Negro, I have watched white churchmen stand on the sideline and mouth pious irrelevancies and sanctimonious trivialities. In the midst of a mighty struggle to rid our nation of racial and economic injustice, I have heard many ministers say: “Those are social issues, with which the gospel has no real concern.” And I have watched many churches commit themselves to a completely other-worldly religion which makes a strange, un-Biblical distinction between body and soul, between the sacred and the secular . . .

Yes, these questions are still in my mind. In deep disappointment I have wept over the laxity of the church. But be assured that my tears have been tears of love. There can be no deep disappointment where there is not deep love. Yes, I love the church. How could I do otherwise? I am in the rather unique position of being the son, the grandson and the great-grandson of preachers. Yes, I see the church as the body of Christ. But, oh! How we have blemished and scarred that body through social neglect and through fear of being nonconformists.

There was a time when the church was very powerful—in the time when the early Christians rejoiced at being deemed worthy to suffer for what they believed. In those days the church was not merely a thermometer that recorded the ideas and principles of popular opinion; it was a thermostat that transformed the mores of society. Whenever the early Christians entered a town, the people in power became disturbed and immediately sought to convict the Christians for being “disturbers of the peace” and “outside agitators.” But the Christians pressed on in the conviction that they were “a colony of heaven,” called to obey God rather than man . . .

Things are different now. So often the contemporary church is a weak, ineffectual voice with an uncertain sound. So often it is an arch-defender of the status quo. Far from being disturbed by the presence of the church, the power structure of the average community is consoled by the church’s silent—and often even vocal—sanction of things as they are.

But the judgment of God is upon the church as never before. If today’s church does not recapture the sacrificial spirit of the early church, it will lose its authenticity, forfeit the loyalty of millions, and be dismissed as an irrelevant social club with no meaning for the twentieth century.2

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1 “Statement by Alabama Clergymen, April 12, 1963,” The Martin Luther King, Jr. Paper Project at Stanford University Website, http://www.stanford.edu/group/King/frequentdocs/clergy.pdf.
2 Martin Luther King, Jr. “Letter from a Birmingham Jail, April 16, 1963,” The Martin Luther King, Jr. Paper Project at Stanford University Website, http://www.stanford.edu/group/King/frequentdocs/birmingham.pdf.